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Margie Joseph - Hear the Words... - Killer Soul - Lamont Dozier LP
LP

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Margie Joseph - Hear the Words.

LP
Cotillion
1976 Canada Issue
Record is VG++ ( listen)
Cover: VG+ VG++ small hole punch bottom right (see pic)


1) Hear The Words, Feel The Feeling
2) Didn't I Tell You
3) Why'd You Lie
4) Prophecy

5) All Cried Out
6) Something To Fall Back On
7) Don't Turn The Lights Off
8) Feeling My Way
9) I Get Carried Away



Great Lamont Dozier production with the classic "Prophecy". I think "Why'd You Lie" is just as good though.

Switching to Cotillion Records, a subsidiary of Atlantic activated by then Atlantic executive Henry Allen, Margie headed out West to work with the legendary Lamont Dozier (the hitmaking Motown songwriter who had established himself as an artist in the early ‘70’s while creating the Hot Wax and Invictus labels with partners Brian & Eddie Holland). The initial result was the catchy, much underrated Hear The Words, Feel The Feeling, the title track for an entire album that also included the excellent Don’t Turn The Lights Off.




While she never achieved the fame, success or recognition of Aretha Franklin or Roberta Flack, the two women considered the reigning black female divas at Atlantic Records through the ‘70’s, Southern soul sister Margie Joseph established herself as an R&B hitmaker through her work with the label which encompassed an impressive half-a-dozen albums.


Although New Orleans has been her home for most of her life, Margie was actually born in Pascagoula, Mississippi. Like so many of her musical contemporaries, Margie expressing her musical talents by singing in local church choirs. During her college days at Dillard University in New Orleans, Margie began pursuing a musical career: in 1967, she recorded a couple of songs in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, then rapidly becoming an important center for Southern soul music. She was briefly signed to Okeh Records,

then the R&B arm for Columbia Records but since the company was in the process of folding the Okeh set-up, Margie’s one release for the label ("Why Does A Man Have To Lie") received no attention. Undaunted, Margie signed with Volt Records (the sister label for Memphis-based R&B giant Stax Records) in 1969. Her initial work was produced by New Orleans’ musical legend Willie Tee (Turbinton) but it did only marginally well. It was when Stax executives (and Margie’s husband/manager Larry McKinley, a popular New Orleans radio and t.v. personality) decided to switch producers (to Freddy Briggs) that Margie enjoyed her first taste of chart success with the single "Your Sweet Loving" in the summer of 1970, which was also the year she graduated from college.

Undaunted, Margie signed with Volt Records (the sister label for Memphis-based R&B giant Stax Records) in 1969. Her initial work was produced by New Orleans’ musical legend Willie Tee (Turbinton) but it did only marginally well. It was when Stax executives (and Margie’s husband/manager Larry McKinley, a popular New Orleans radio and t.v. personality) decided to switch producers (to Freddy Briggs) that Margie enjoyed her first taste of chart success with the single "Your Sweet Loving" in the summer of 1970, which was also the year she graduated from college.

Less than a year later, Margie had begun to make her mark with R&B music buyers. A stunning remake of The Supremes’ 1965 hit "Stop! In The Name Of Love" with an engaging opening rap became a Top 40 R&B hit in the spring of 1971 and led to strong sales for the singer’s debut album, "Margie Joseph Makes A New Impression."

A second album entitled "Phase II," featuring another cover of a Supremes’ hit ("My World Is Empty Without You") and released in 1972 did not receive the same attention. As a result, Larry McKinley had complete negotiations with Atlantic executive Jerry Wexler by the spring of ‘72 and Margie was ensconced in the label’s New York studios in June for her first sessions with producer Arif Mardin.

Mardin’s work with Aretha Franklin had prepared him for producing Margie, whose vocal style was frequently compared to that of "Lady Soul." In a comment to Britain’s "Blues & Soul" magazine in 1976, Margie noted, "...people say we sound similar. But I’ve been trying to let people see that we are different, trying to let them see what I can do..."

In an earlier more telling comment, Margie felt that her first self-titled Mardin-produced album "...sounded too much as if the company wanted me to be another Aretha. In fact, the material seemed like just the kind of things Aretha would do." Producer Mardin did indeed use top New York session players like drummer Bernard Purdie, keyboardist Richard Tee, guitarists Cornell Dupree and Hugh McCracken, bassist Jerry Jemmott and percussionist Ralph MacDonald, many of whom had worked with Franklin.

Nonetheless, Margie added her own stamp to the June ‘72 sessions and the first two cuts on this collection—the gorgeous R&B gem Let’s Go Somewhere And Love and a Dolly Parton composition, Touch Your Woman -- are from that first recording date for Atlantic. Further sessions for the album took place in September and yielded a cover of Al Green’s 1971 hit Let’s Stay Together which became Margie’s first hit single for Atlantic in the spring of 1973.

By the summer of that year, Margie was in the studio again with producer Mardin for sessions for her "Sweet Surrender" album. This time, the material was much more varied ranging from the upfront R&B feel of singer/songwriter Paul Kelly’s Come Lay Some Lovin’ On Me (which became a bigger hit for Margie than for its creator, who released his version three months before Atlantic released her single in October ‘73) to a cover of former Beatle Paul McCartney’s pop smash My Love, which had been a hit only a short time before Margie gave it her soulful touch. As it turned out, the track ended up being her biggest ever hit, making the Top 10 on the R&B charts and the Hot 100’s Top 75.

In the same pop-flavored vein, Margie cut an English version of an Italian hit, Words (Are Impossible) for the June ‘74 sessions for her third album entitled "Margie," considered by Joseph connoisseurs to be easily one of her best LPs, in spite of its lack of chart-making material. From that same album come the Robert John composition, the infectious I Can’t Move No Mountains and the truly beautiful Stay Still, one of the few compositions Margie co-wrote for her Atlantic albums, and a mid-sized R&B hit in the fall of 1975.

It was after Margie did a March 1976 gig in Jamaica with vocal group Blue Magic (who’d begun to have their share of hits with tunes like "Sideshow" and "Three Ring Circus") that the idea of doing a duet arose: in June, Margie and the five-man group recorded What’s Come Over Me, a song Blue Magic had included on their 1974 self-titled debut album and used as the "B" side to their Top 40 1973 R&B hit "Look Me Up."

Included in Blue Magic’s "13 Blue Magic Lane" album, the duet proved successful when released as a single towards the end of 1975, giving Margie her second biggest R&B hit and prompting the team to work together at New Jersey’s Latin Casino where they cut an entire ‘live’ album, along with fellow Atlantic artist Major Harris. Plans for an entire Joseph-Blue Magic duet LP never materialized although a couple more studio recordings were made but never released.




Margie Joseph - Don't Turn The Lights Off




Margie Joseph - Prophecy

produced by Lamont Dozier. Backing vocals on this track by The Jones Girls...Ray Parker Jr. on guitar





Margie Joseph - Why'd You Lie

Great album - I Get Carried Away is another fabulous track from it. And everyone from a complete A list of musicians - McKinley Jackson on piano and doing the arrangements, Ray Parker Jr and Lee Ritenour on guitar, Lamont Dozier songwriting... this is top quality

Backing vocals on this track by The Jones Girls


This product was added to our catalog on Saturday 28 June, 2008.

 
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